WEB DESIGN: For over twenty years, I have developed client sites for large and small businesses and in every sector imaginable. I develop responsive websites with WordPress which is the industry standard for website development. I specialize in Responsive Web Design so your website displays automatically on any device. Responsive design makes the most sense when developing your new business website because the design adjusts itself to the size of a user's screen. Your website visitors will be able to view all of your content on a desktop computer,...
Your site would need to have a text only option, with all functionality accessible through a keyboard for visitors with mobility issues. Once you make these and other changes to meet ADA guidelines, your site would need to be tested by a website development company familiar with ADA compliance issues to be sure that visitors who use assistive technology such as screen readers are able to access your web content fully.

Your site would need to have a text only option, with all functionality accessible through a keyboard for visitors with mobility issues. Once you make these and other changes to meet ADA guidelines, your site would need to be tested by a website development company familiar with ADA compliance issues to be sure that visitors who use assistive technology such as screen readers are able to access your web content fully.

This is an article that most other website developers probably don’t want you to read. The reason is that most other web designers basically like to think of themselves as all-powerful wizards with magical powers. And they use complex technical jargon and terminology to intimidate and mystify their clients into thinking that what they do is more complex than it is.
Legal precedent is changing, and ADA compliance related lawsuits are becoming more successful, and the courts are seeing more of them as a result. Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act pertains to private sector businesses. Lately, those protections are more frequently expanding into digital territory as web and mobile applications become more necessary in our day-to-day lives.

!function(n){function e(e){for(var t,r,i=e[0],a=e[1],u=0,c=[];u1&&arguments[1]!==undefined?arguments[1]:"",t=window,r=Date.now();if(n=e+n,t.ansFrontendGlobals&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings.gates&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings.gates.react_console_log_perf_info){var i=t.performance&&t.performance.now?t.performance.now():r;console.log("".concat(n,": ").concat(i))}o[n]=r}},iuEU:function(n,e){n.exports=react-relay},oqNQ:function(n,e,t){"use strict";t.r(e);var o=t("S0B4");Object(o.a)("entryLoaded");var r=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"A+VG")).then(function(e){n(e)})};window.runApp=function(){Object(o.a)("runAppCalled"),r(function(n){n.runApp()})},window.inlineReact=function(n,e,t,r){Object(o.a)("InlineReactCalled","loadable"),a(n,e,t,r)},window.shimProxy=window.shimProxy||{webnodeSubscribeEventsQueue:[]};var i=!1,a=function(n,e,t,a){var u=function(){i||(i=!0,r(function(r){Object(o.a)("StartAppInlineReactCalled","loadable"),r.inlineReact(n,e,t,a)}))};window.shimProxy.webnode?window.shimProxy.webnode.subscribe("REACT_LOADABLE_LOADED",u):window.shimProxy.webnodeSubscribeEventsQueue.push(["REACT_LOADABLE_LOADED",u])};window.renderPrefetchedPage=function(n,e,t,o){r(function(r){r.renderPrefetchedPage(n,e,t,o)})},window.reportPageSpeedData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.reportPageData(n)})},window.setTimingData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.setTimingData(n)})},window.setGlobalMetadata=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"Gnru")).then(function(e){e.setGlobalMetadata(n)})},window.updateGlobalMetadata=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"Gnru")).then(function(e){e.updateGlobalMetadata(n)})},window.setServerPerfCheckpointData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.setServerPerfCheckpointData(n)})},window.setWebnodeLoadable=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"0xW3")).then(function(e){e.setWebnodeLoadable(n)})}}});
If your website is not already ADA compliant, you are automatically missing out on millions of potential customers who cannot access your site due to their disabilities. In fact, there are nearly 50 million people with disabilities in the U.S., which means about 19 percent of this country has a disability. Many of them might be interested in your products or services, but once they arrive at your website, they won't be able to navigate easily enough to buy anything or even contact you, all because your website is only accessible to people without disabilities. Thus, they may move on to your competitors.

The fact that an ADA compliant website can increase your target audience by millions is just one reason to make your site more accessible. Another benefit is that not only will you get more customers, but those customers will also know how valuable they are to your business. After all, they might have gone to a few other websites that were not ADA compliant, disappointed each time that they couldn’t access the content, until they got to your website.

If posted on an accessible website, tax forms need to be available to people with disabilities in an accessible format on the same terms that they are available to other members of the public – 24 hours a day, seven days a week, without cost, inconvenience, or delay. A staffed telephone line that sent copies of tax forms to callers through the mail would not provide equal access to people with disabilities because of the delay involved in mailing the forms.


I recently finished a training in ADA compliance for websites. It was illuminating and daunting, as I realizated that there’s a lot of work to be done. It also reiterated—in no uncertain terms—a gospel I’ve been preaching for several years now. Sites need to be accessible for everyone on every platform. Previously I was just focusing on responsive sites (sites that reformat for the device used, such as a phone or tablet.) Since responsive sites are de rigueur these days, I’d like to focus on your site’s accessibility…can it be accessed by people with disabilities? This includes screen readers and other technology. It’s not just a nice thing, it’s a civil law.
Luckily, the international nonprofit World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) brings together smart people who develop open standards to ensure the long-term growth of the Web. They produce recommendations for making websites fair and equally accessible for the highest number of people possible. Their Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) 2.1 offer clear guidance for web developers to achieve ADA compliance.
The ADA’s relationship with websites has been a complicated and often confusing story. The ADA does not explicitly address online compliance, even after undergoing several amendments in the far more web-oriented era of 2008. With no specific coverage under the law, it usually falls to the courts to determine how ADA standards apply to websites—or whether they do at all. 

As organizations around the world scramble to bring their sites into compliance with the World Wide Web Consortium’s Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG), focus on other, preexisting accessibility regulations has also intensified. The United States’ Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) is one of the most visible and complicated pieces of accessibility legislation. Let’s look at some of the ins and outs of what an ADA compliant website means today. Or, if you're interested in seeing the nitty-gritty details of your site's accessibility, request a free website audit report using the form on this page.
For discussion’s sake – while I don’t know the specific nature of your videos, my guess is that they might be demonstrating various techniques or other content in which simply hearing the audio of the video wouldn’t deliver the full context of the content. If making that content accessible is something you’d want to do, you’d likely want to start with a written description of what takes place in the video. Beyond that, high contrast vector images or diagrams showcasing specific parts of the technique would certainly help.

Hi! I'm Gina, a freelance graphic and web designer that specializes in building brand identities and intuitive websites for new entrepreneurs and small businesses. My goal is to help you build a brand that accurately conveys your essence and is flexible enough to evolve with you as you grow. Let's work together to find and hone your brand voice, so that your audience can hear your message loud and clear!
Webpage designers often have aesthetic preferences and may want everyone to see their webpages in exactly the same color, size and layout. But because of their disability, many people with low vision do not see webpages the same as other people. Some see only small portions of a computer display at one time. Others cannot see text or images that are too small. Still others can only see website content if it appears in specific colors. For these reasons, many people with low vision use specific color and font settings when they access the Internet – settings that are often very different from those most people use. For example, many people with low vision need to use high contrast settings, such as bold white or yellow letters on a black background. Others need just the opposite – bold black text on a white or yellow background. And, many must use softer, more subtle color combinations.
The average cost for hiring a web designer varies greatly depending on the scope of the work, which may range from building a site from scratch to rebranding an existing one, as well as the amount of content and graphics the designer will create. In general, the more complex the project, the more time the design agency will have to spend. Because web designers often work on an hourly basis, the longer the project, the higher the costs; you can count on the web designer spending at minimum 10 hours to create a very basic website with just a handful of pages with few elements. Prices also depend on the designer’s skill set, the process, and the company’s rates. In general, the national average cost for a basic website package starts at $500, but a customized website can cost as much as $2,000 or more. Here are typical average hourly rates, broken out by the complexity of the work:
Case law has been the most helpful in illuminating the implications of the ADA for websites.There have been lawsuits involving companies like Expedia, Hotels.com, Southwest Airlines, and Target as defendants and primarily featuring accessibility organizations as plaintiffs. These cases had mixed results, but each helped clarify the ADA's jurisdiction on the web. 
It’s well-known that the Americans With Disabilities Act (ADA) requires brick-and-mortar businesses be accessible to all patrons. This includes considerations like wheelchair accessibility and Braille or large print for blind and low-vision patrons, among other things. The ADA references “public accommodations,” and outlines 12 categories that essentially covers all types of public-facing businesses. However, the legislation does not address public-facing websites.
Two agencies within the U.S. Department of Labor enforce parts of the ADA. The Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs (OFCCP) has coordinating authority under the employment-related provisions of the ADA. The Civil Rights Center (CRC) is responsible for enforcing Title II of the ADA as it applies to the labor- and workforce-related practices of state and local governments and other public entities. Visit the Laws & Regulations subtopic for specific information on these provisions.
The fact that an ADA compliant website can increase your target audience by millions is just one reason to make your site more accessible. Another benefit is that not only will you get more customers, but those customers will also know how valuable they are to your business. After all, they might have gone to a few other websites that were not ADA compliant, disappointed each time that they couldn’t access the content, until they got to your website.
Many web developers have already realized this too and are exploiting business owners for $3k-$20k to make their sites compliant because they have no choice.  So we came up with an extremely low-cost solution so everyone can remove themselves from risk, have compliant websites, and immediately.  My website iFuzeMarketing.com is compliant.  Visit it, press the handicap widget at the top, and play with its simple functions.  We can custom build and install one for anyone's website that's reading this.  It will deliver all the same functions, and we'll code it into your site for you so you don't have to worry about this risk any longer.  Everybody needs this.  Feel free to contact me for details if interested.

Our clients choose to work with us for a multitude of reasons.  Could it be our 99% customer satisfaction rating?  Or maybe our two decades of serving innkeepers?  Or perhaps our dedicated professionals with more than 100 years of combined industry experience?  Or rather our experience across multiple lodging segments? How could your property benefit from working with a trusted lodging partner?
The good news for potential defendants is that the only remedies available in private ADA suits are injunctions that force you to come into compliance and attorneys’ fees. If the Department of Justice gets involved, they can seek civil fines and penalties. Hence, you need to do the risk/benefit analysis as to whether it is worth challenging the claim or not. This report says the lawsuits are on the rise.
!function(n){function e(e){for(var t,r,i=e[0],a=e[1],u=0,c=[];u1&&arguments[1]!==undefined?arguments[1]:"",t=window,r=Date.now();if(n=e+n,t.ansFrontendGlobals&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings.gates&&t.ansFrontendGlobals.settings.gates.react_console_log_perf_info){var i=t.performance&&t.performance.now?t.performance.now():r;console.log("".concat(n,": ").concat(i))}o[n]=r}},iuEU:function(n,e){n.exports=react-relay},oqNQ:function(n,e,t){"use strict";t.r(e);var o=t("S0B4");Object(o.a)("entryLoaded");var r=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"A+VG")).then(function(e){n(e)})};window.runApp=function(){Object(o.a)("runAppCalled"),r(function(n){n.runApp()})},window.inlineReact=function(n,e,t,r){Object(o.a)("InlineReactCalled","loadable"),a(n,e,t,r)},window.shimProxy=window.shimProxy||{webnodeSubscribeEventsQueue:[]};var i=!1,a=function(n,e,t,a){var u=function(){i||(i=!0,r(function(r){Object(o.a)("StartAppInlineReactCalled","loadable"),r.inlineReact(n,e,t,a)}))};window.shimProxy.webnode?window.shimProxy.webnode.subscribe("REACT_LOADABLE_LOADED",u):window.shimProxy.webnodeSubscribeEventsQueue.push(["REACT_LOADABLE_LOADED",u])};window.renderPrefetchedPage=function(n,e,t,o){r(function(r){r.renderPrefetchedPage(n,e,t,o)})},window.reportPageSpeedData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.reportPageData(n)})},window.setTimingData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.setTimingData(n)})},window.setGlobalMetadata=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"Gnru")).then(function(e){e.setGlobalMetadata(n)})},window.updateGlobalMetadata=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"Gnru")).then(function(e){e.updateGlobalMetadata(n)})},window.setServerPerfCheckpointData=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"pys6")).then(function(e){e.setServerPerfCheckpointData(n)})},window.setWebnodeLoadable=function(n){Promise.all([t.e("vendor"),t.e("common")]).then(t.bind(null,"0xW3")).then(function(e){e.setWebnodeLoadable(n)})}}});

Do all websites have to be ADA compliant? Does yours? Though the legal definitions are somewhat unclear, it is clear that inaccessibility invites legal action and misgivings from customers. Web accessibility does not have to be complex, and it may not take much to test your site and make it accessible. Take web accessibility step by step and you can avoid stressful lawsuits, and invite all patrons to your website.

The ADA is the Americans with Disabilities Act, passed almost 30 years ago in 1990. This act was originally put in motion pertaining solely to physical location. It requires establishments to provide people with disabilities easy access to various levels throughout the business. This act was set to achieve an equal experience to all people, handicapped or not.
×